Life on the Spectrum

As I said in a previous post, I don’t think we need any more autism awareness. One of the things we do need is autism acceptance. What is autism acceptance, though? What does it look like?

Autism acceptance means not trying to make an autistic person act like a typical person. It means allowing us to have our stims, as long as they’re not hurting us or anyone else, and allowing us to avoid making eye contact if it’s difficult.

Autism acceptance means not saying, “I love my child but I hate his/her autism.” It means accepting your child, autism and all.

Autism acceptance means making accommodation for our sensory needs and allowing us to wear earmuffs or headphones in noisy environments, turning off the fluorescent lights, allowing us to wear comfortable clothes instead of expecting us to wear ties or frilly blouses or, heaven forbid, pantyhose.

Autism acceptance means accepting our desire to not be cured. It means not seeing us as broken or defective or needing to be fixed.

Autism acceptance means using autism-first language when referring to an autistic person rather than insisting on person-first language if that is what the autistic person uses. It means accepting our self-identification as autistic people and not insisting that “you are not your autism” or “you are a person before you are autistic.”

Autism acceptance means acknowledging the existence of autistic adults and not limiting your autism “awareness” to children. It means accepting autistic adults into your autism organizations, and it means funding programs and services that benefit autistic adults as well as autistic children.

Autism acceptance means listening to autistic people when we talk about our lived experience of autism rather than ignoring us in favour of autism “experts” and autism parents (except for autism parents who are themselves autistic, of course.) This includes listening to people who use assistive communication devices instead of dismissing them for being “low-functioning.”

Autism acceptance means accepting autistic people regardless of so-called functioning labels. It means not dismissing the opinions and contributions of autistic people for either being too high-functioning — “you can write a blog post so therefore you are too high-functioning to understand what life is like for my child” — or too low-functioning — “you are low-functioning so you can’t possibly understand what I’m talking about.” In fact, autism acceptance should mean not using artificial functioning labels at all.

Autism acceptance means accepting autistic people as we are, and not how you think we should be or how you want us to be.

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Comments on: "What is Autism Acceptance?" (1)

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