Life on the Spectrum

Archive for July, 2015

How Can You Have an Autism Working Group with No Autistic People in It?

The headline reads “Federal Government Appoints New Autism Spectrum Disorder Working Group.” The aims of this group are “information sharing and research, early detection, diagnosis and treatment, and ways to support Canadian families affected by ASD.” Notice that it says “families affected,” not “autistic people.”

The members of this group are scientists, researchers, and heads or board members of various autism groups such as Autism Canada, Autism Speaks, Canadian Autism Spectrum Disorder Alliance and Autism Nova Scotia. There are no representatives from Autistic Self-Advocacy Network or other groups that represent autistic people ourselves rather than parents. In fact, there are no autistic people in this autism working group.

This is, sadly, not unusual. Autistic people are very seldom consulted by any government agency or autism service organization when they are making plans for us, if they actually are making plans for us and not just for autistic children. I have Tweeted to the federal minister responsible for this working group, the hon. Rona Ambrose, and I have left a comment on her announcement on her Facebook page, but I haven’t heard anything in response, probably because she, like everyone else in the federal government, is currently preoccupied with the upcoming election in October.

I don’t object to early detection of autism, nor do I object to support to families. However, I think there are many more goals that an autism working group could have rather than just support for families or just early detection and treatment. For example, how about working on the fact that the vast majority of autistic adults are unemployed and live in poverty? How about the fact that there are almost no support services for autistic adults once we leave our family homes? How about the fact that most so-called autism service agencies have no autistic people on their boards of directors?

If they want to work on diagnosis, how about creating and funding diagnostic services for those who were not diagnosed as children? There are many, many undiagnosed autistic adults out there who are unable to find anyone able or willing to assess an adult, and if they can find someone, they can’t pay for the assessment because the province they live in does not fund such services for adults.

The announcement about the working group is here. I encourage autistic adults living in Canada to contact the group and Minister Ambrose. Suggest what you would like to see addressed by this working group. Challenge the minister to add autistic self-advocates to the group. Her e-mail address is rona.ambrose@parl.gc.ca. Her website is ronaambrose.com. Her twitter is @RonaAmbrose. There is also contact information for the group at the link above.

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Autistic Adults Travel, Too!

I am planning to go on a trip in a few weeks. This has, as is usual with me, kicked my anxiety into overdrive. I am in my 40s, and I have never been on an airplane in my life. Everything I have heard about airport security being suspicious of anyone who acts nervous in the slightest way has made me seek out information and tips for traveling while autistic. What are airports like in terms of sensory input? Will it bother airport security if I have trouble making eye contact? Do I have to let them touch me? What if my auditory processing issues make me miss the announcement for my flight?

There is almost no information available for adult autistics when it comes to travel. Do a Google search for “flying” or “traveling” and “autism” or “Asperger’s,” and you’ll find “tips for autistic travelers and their families,” and “flying with your Asperger’s child” and “information for families of children with special needs.” It’s even worse for non-Americans, because most of the information that is available makes reference to the TSA and the Americans with Disabilities Act, which are not relevant if you’re not traveling to or in the U.S.

Guess what. Autistic people travel. We go on holidays just like non-autistic people (those who can afford to do so, at least). We travel to autism conferences and/or to conferences related to our special interests. Some autistic people travel on business. There are autistic people who are in demand as speakers and lecturers who have to fly to the places they give their lectures. So why is there so little information? I can only guess that it’s because if an autistic adult is able to travel on his or her own, he or she must be considered to be “high functioning” and therefore assumed to not need help. I was even told that there is information for children and not adults because adults, being adults, don’t need any help with such routine, everyday things as getting on an airplane.

Fortunately, I was able to find help from a fellow Aspergian person who has experience with air travel, and some help from Westjet airline. The answers to my questions were as follows:

“What are airports like in terms of sensory input?” I was told I should bring my earplugs, because airports are noisy places, but not to use them unless absolutely necessary so that I can hear the security agents speak to me and so that I can hear when my flight is called.

” Will it bother airport security if I have trouble making eye contact?” It might, but if I explain to them that I am autistic they will probably understand. If I am able to do so, though, I should try to make eye contact. It’s a big thing to demand of an autistic person, but it may be necessary.

“Do I have to let them touch me?”  Because I am flying within Canada and not internationally, I probably won’t be patted down as long as I do not have anything metallic on my body. I should make sure that I don’t wear an underwire bra.

“What if my auditory processing issues make me miss the announcement for my flight?” If I identify myself as a person with a disability, I should be permitted to bring a person with me into the terminal who can listen for me. On the airplane, I can request written copies of in-flight announcements, like the safety briefing.

I’ve been told it’s a good idea to have some handouts about autism ready to give to people who may have questions.

My chosen airline, Westjet, has a lot of information and support available for customers with disabilities, and I will contact them a few days before my flight to touch base and find out if there is anything they can do to make my trip easier for me.

My biggest anxiety now is actually booking my flight and making it to the airport. Whenever something causes me anxiety, I actively avoid doing it, even if it’s something positive. My trip makes me nervous, so I’m still putting off buying my plane ticket. I’d better do it soon, because I have already paid for a three-day sightseeing package at my destination.

Once I return from my trip, I hope to have more information available for my fellow autistic travelers to help others who have the same questions I have.